Parentified Daughters : The Destructive Effects

( Parentified Daughters )

When Mom clings to her daughter and looks to her for closeness … she sets a dysfunctional destructive cycle in motion. 

This destructive dynamic happens all too easily.

Dad says something clueless or, in mom’s view, thoughtless, and a knowing glance towards her daughter is followed by an EYEROLL.

Before you know it, mom and daughter have a repertoire of jokes, mutual understandings, and, you guessed it-a closer relationship than her parents have with each other.

This dynamic initially makes Mom feel affirmed, and her daughter enjoys a free ticket into the adult world of relating.

If this dynamic continues, what happens? ticket, I would argue that it does more harm than good. 

Because the daughter isn’t developmentally equipped to handle the adult realm of an emotional partnership (and shouldn’t be), her partnership with mom is, by definition, one-sided.

It is not the partnership of equals.

Over time an implicit familial agreement solidifies; a daughter is the only one who “gets Mom,” Therefore, she feels the pressure to see that mom’s emotional needs are met.

Her parent’s marriage grows stale more often than not, and the daughter is trapped in a dynamic that holds her back from following her own developmental trajectory- the role of the “good” daughter.

All may look picture perfect on the outside, no divorce, a father in the home, and mother/daughter closeness-

What could be wrong with that?

In this case, just about everything.

The beautiful family Holiday card hides a dysfunctional secret. 

Mom and dad’s marriage is dead on the vine, and the attuned daughter trapped in the role of the good daughter is sacrificing her normal striving for independence. In this oppressive environment, nothing healthy grows. 

Conversely, in a healthy family environment, the parents attend to each other’s needs well enough to free the children to develop, differentiate, and eventually set off on their own.

In this darker dysfunctional scenario, the daughter is trapped in an impossible dilemma. Because she is attuned to mom and knows her moods like the back of her hand, she feels it is her job to take emotional care of mom.

Because of this clinging, the daughter may feel she can’t leave Mom.

She may be unaware of feeling guilty and unconsciously sabotage her attempts at growing up. At the unconscious level, the daughter may feel that in growing up, she is betraying mom.

Anxiety, depression, or eating disorders may have at their psychological core a daughter who doesn’t feel she has permission to grow up and away from mom.

Like a Chinese finger trap, the grip only tightens when she tries to get free. Attempts to differentiate bring on guilt that constricts and suffocates.

How does this dynamic play out?

When the daughter does dare try and pull away from mom, mom grows more and more controlling. Finally, mom can’t let go.

What are normally tense times around boys, makeup, and clothing choices become full-out Amagedon battles to the death- the death of the daughter’s independence. Mom becomes ultra-critical of her daughter.

What underlies this criticism? 

It isn’t that her daughter is doing anything (necessarily) wrong. Instead, the ultra-criticalness stems from mom’s realization her daughter is growing up and away from her.

This criticism is confusing and unfair for her daughter. She doesn’t understand why she suddenly comes under fire. In response to mom’s hyper control, daughters frequently respond in one of two ways;

1)  They buckle under, lose their quest for independence, and often with it their thirst for life.  They turn in on themselves in destructive ways. Depression, cutting, eating, and anxiety disorders are ways girls turn the rage they feel in on themselves.

2) Alternatively, they meet fire with fire, control with counter control, and wage all-out defiance of their mother’s control- Alcohol and drug abuse, promiscuity, or random rule-breaking. Finally, in a perfect dysfunctional storm, they express their rage in a way that will cause them to feel shame and guilt, resulting in a return to mother “who knows best.”

Frequently, parentified daughters go underground and hide their acting out behaviors. As a result, they continue to feel ashamed of themselves and don’t have a complete understanding of their actions.

parentified daughter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because of the built-up rage at having been unfairly handed a role that wasn’t theirs, to begin with, coupled with crippling guilt at betraying mom, some daughters act out in ways that express that rage while making them feel bad about themselves. 

A perfect storm of enmeshment, rage, guilt, and betrayal results in a cycle that ends with the daughter’s return to her partnership with mom. Neither response, either internalizing the battle or throwing themselves into an external battle, help them gain independence they can feel good about

 

What happens when the parentified daughter has her own daughter? 

Both the complacent daughter and the former rebel are likely to return to the fold without fully establishing themselves as separate adults. Life may feel bleached of its vibrancy, and the adult good daughter may not know why.

If mom stays at the center of her emotional life, her adult daughter will have difficulty establishing and maintaining a full sexual and emotionally intimate relationship with her adult partner. Sadly, without awareness, she will also have difficulty letting her daughter fly guilt-free into her own life. Yet, with awareness and hard work, the cycle can be broken.

It is never too late to live fully into your own life.

To find out if you suffer from the Good Daughter Syndrome- go here.

 

When Mom clings to her daughter and stops looking for closeness with her husband... she sets a dysfunctional destructive cycle into motion. Click To Tweet Anxiety, depression, or eating disorders can have at their psychological core a daughter who doesn't feel she has permission to grow up and away from mom. Click To Tweet When a daughter is attuned to mom and knows her moods like the back of her hand, she may feel it is her job to take emotional care of mom. Click To Tweet If mom stays at the center of her emotional life her adult daughter will have a hard time establishing and maintaining a full sexual and emotionally intimate relationship with her adult partner. Click To Tweet When daughters are parentified, both the complacent daughter and the former rebel are likely to return to the fold without having fully established themselves as separate adults. Click To Tweet A perfect dysfunctional storm of enmeshment, rage, guilt, and betrayal can result in daughter's return to her partnership with mom without having established a healthy independence. Click To Tweet

 

 

 

 

Do you relate?
If so, here are some ways I can help on your journey from Good Daughter to Empowered Woman:

Do you have The Good Daughter Syndrome? Take the Quiz (It’s Free)

Read the first two chapters of The 4 Good Daughter Traps- Break Free of Your Difficult Mother and Take control of Your Life …for Free- Go here! 

Watch & Learn Video Course Practical Strategies for Dealing with a Narcissistic, Borderline, or Difficult Mother That Work Tips honed from working with daughters of difficult mothers for 30 years, as a psychotherapist.

What Kind of Good Daughter Are You? Conflicted? Independent? Obedient? Take this (Free) Quiz

Consult with Katherine- Private Coaching – When it’s time to tell your story.

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Comments

4 Comments

  1. Ken

    Being the pushed-out stepdad is emotionally devastating

    Reply
    • Katherine Fabrizio

      I hear you, Ken. Thank you for adding to the discussion. If you feel free I’d like to hear more.

      Reply
  2. Sandra D

    In all my searching for ‘what is wrong with me’, I never put parentification and self destruction together.
    Here I am with chronic illness and living under the care of my mother. It’s so sad!

    Reply
    • Katherine Fabrizio

      Hi Sandra- thank you for writing. Yes, its a thing and yes, there is still hope. I hope you will find ways to break free on this site. I’ll keep on writing to help daughters like you. You aren’t alone. Awareness is power.

      Reply

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